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The Hydrogen Car and Multifuel DVD is BANNED from GOOGLE !

Posted in commerce, Energy, Environment, History, Michigan, Science, society, Survival by farmerjaneusa on May 24, 2011

From the USH2.com website:

WHAT GOOGLE DID TO STEVEN HARRIS AND ROY MCALISTER
What did Google Do to us ?? This is a story you just are NOT going to believe. Google has BANNED our sale of our famous 3.5 Hour Hydrogen Car and Multifuel DVD by Roy McAlister and Steven Harris.

From USH2.com: Roy McAlister standing next to his 1991 Geo Metro Multifuel Vehicle. This car runs on Gasoline, Natural Gas, Land fill Methane, Hydrogen, Propane, home made turpine fuel and any combination of the above fuels with hydrogen, or hydrogen on its own.

We use Google “Adwords” to advertise our DVD and other Hydrogen Books, DVDs and Solar Items. Google Adwords are the “ads” that show up in the RIGHT SIDE of the search screen in Google. Google has a policy that you cannot sell ‘false’ things on google adwords. This includes the selling of anything related to a car that runs on water. Cars that run on water are 100% Junk Science, False, 100% Stupidity and a 100% Scam and WE AGREE that this should not be something available for sale but the problem is Google Does NOT know the difference between Hydrogen and water !! Read on….

Reuters states Google has invested over $350 MILLION dollars in Alternative Energy Programs and despite this corporate commitment some Google Employees DO NOT know the difference between Hydrogen and water. NO Matter HOW BLATANTLY I posted on the advertisement that this is NOT a water car, that the car really does run on Hydrogen and other fuels. (See the 18 minute video of it running on PURE HYDROGEN and home made turpines) Google REFUSES to allow the ad and has now SUSPENDED my entire Google Adwords Account !!! This is a VERY Serious thing to have your account suspended…its not trivial. This happened WHILE I had letter of explanation submitted to them and WHILE the account was under a REVIEW.

Visit USH2.com for the rest of the story and more information about the DVD.

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Paul Revere’s Ride

Posted in History, society by farmerjaneusa on May 15, 2011

Paul Revere’s Ride

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Listen my children and you shall hear
Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere,
On the eighteenth of April, in Seventy-five;
Hardly a man is now alive
Who remembers that famous day and year.

He said to his friend, “If the British march
By land or sea from the town to-night,
Hang a lantern aloft in the belfry arch
Of the North Church tower as a signal light,–
One if by land, and two if by sea;
And I on the opposite shore will be,
Ready to ride and spread the alarm
Through every Middlesex village and farm,
For the country folk to be up and to arm.

“Then he said “Good-night!” and with muffled oar
Silently rowed to the Charlestown shore,
Just as the moon rose over the bay,
Where swinging wide at her moorings lay
The Somerset, British man-of-war;
A phantom ship, with each mast and spar
Across the moon like a prison bar,
And a huge black hulk, that was magnified
By its own reflection in the tide.

Meanwhile, his friend through alley and street
Wanders and watches, with eager ears,
Till in the silence around him he hears
The muster of men at the barrack door,
The sound of arms, and the tramp of feet,
And the measured tread of the grenadiers,
Marching down to their boats on the shore.

Then he climbed the tower of the Old North Church,
By the wooden stairs, with stealthy tread,
To the belfry chamber overhead,
And startled the pigeons from their perch
On the sombre rafters, that round him made
Masses and moving shapes of shade,–
By the trembling ladder, steep and tall,
To the highest window in the wall,
Where he paused to listen and look down
A moment on the roofs of the town
And the moonlight flowing over all.

Beneath, in the churchyard, lay the dead,
In their night encampment on the hill,
Wrapped in silence so deep and still
That he could hear, like a sentinel’s tread,
The watchful night-wind, as it went
Creeping along from tent to tent,
And seeming to whisper, “All is well!”
A moment only he feels the spell
Of the place and the hour, and the secret dread
Of the lonely belfry and the dead;
For suddenly all his thoughts are bent
On a shadowy something far away,
Where the river widens to meet the bay,–
A line of black that bends and floats
On the rising tide like a bridge of boats.

Meanwhile, impatient to mount and ride,
Booted and spurred, with a heavy stride
On the opposite shore walked Paul Revere.
Now he patted his horse’s side,
Now he gazed at the landscape far and near,
Then, impetuous, stamped the earth,
And turned and tightened his saddle girth;
But mostly he watched with eager search
The belfry tower of the Old North Church,
As it rose above the graves on the hill,
Lonely and spectral and sombre and still.
And lo! as he looks, on the belfry’s height
A glimmer, and then a gleam of light!
He springs to the saddle, the bridle he turns,
But lingers and gazes, till full on his sight
A second lamp in the belfry burns.

A hurry of hoofs in a village street,
A shape in the moonlight, a bulk in the dark,
And beneath, from the pebbles, in passing, a spark
Struck out by a steed flying fearless and fleet;
That was all! And yet, through the gloom and the light,
The fate of a nation was riding that night;
And the spark struck out by that steed, in his flight,
Kindled the land into flame with its heat.
He has left the village and mounted the steep,
And beneath him, tranquil and broad and deep,
Is the Mystic, meeting the ocean tides;
And under the alders that skirt its edge,
Now soft on the sand, now loud on the ledge,
Is heard the tramp of his steed as he rides.

It was twelve by the village clock
When he crossed the bridge into Medford town.
He heard the crowing of the cock,
And the barking of the farmer’s dog,
And felt the damp of the river fog,
That rises after the sun goes down.

It was one by the village clock,
When he galloped into Lexington.
He saw the gilded weathercock
Swim in the moonlight as he passed,
And the meeting-house windows, black and bare,
Gaze at him with a spectral glare,
As if they already stood aghast
At the bloody work they would look upon.

It was two by the village clock,
When he came to the bridge in Concord town.
He heard the bleating of the flock,
And the twitter of birds among the trees,
And felt the breath of the morning breeze
Blowing over the meadow brown.
And one was safe and asleep in his bed
Who at the bridge would be first to fall,
Who that day would be lying dead,
Pierced by a British musket ball.

You know the rest. In the books you have read
How the British Regulars fired and fled,—
How the farmers gave them ball for ball,
>From behind each fence and farmyard wall,
Chasing the redcoats down the lane,
Then crossing the fields to emerge again
Under the trees at the turn of the road,
And only pausing to fire and load.

So through the night rode Paul Revere;
And so through the night went his cry of alarm
To every Middlesex village and farm,—
A cry of defiance, and not of fear,
A voice in the darkness, a knock at the door,
And a word that shall echo for evermore!
For, borne on the night-wind of the Past,
Through all our history, to the last,
In the hour of darkness and peril and need,
The people will waken and listen to hear
The hurrying hoof-beats of that steed,
And the midnight message of Paul Revere.

You can also listen to a recording of this poem from 1916 at the Library of Congress website.

A Tobacco Timeline: Pre-15th Century to Present

Posted in advertising, commerce, Environment, games, Health, History, Psychology, Science by farmerjaneusa on March 7, 2011

From Florida State University’s the “Science U” section:

1950’s to Present

A. Three important studies provide links between smoking and lung cancer:

    1. On May 27, 1950 Journal of the American Medical Association: publishes first major study
    2. In same issue, “Tobacco Smoking as a Possible Etiologic Factor in Bronchiogenic Carcinoma: A Study of 684 Proved Cases,” by Ernst L. Wynder and Evarts A. Graham is published.
    3. A Sept 30 British Medical Journal, study by Richard Doll and Bradford Hill reports that heavy smokers fifty times as likely as nonsmokers to contract lung cancer

B. P. Lorillard introduces Kent cigarettes, with an asbestos filter. 1952
C. Dr. Ernst Wynder paints tar on mice backs and causes cancer—first definitive biological link in 1953.
D. 1954 Phillip Morris hires David Hardy to defend against law suit by Missouri smoker who lost larynx to cancer in 1954. Same year, Marlboro man created and advertised as “Delivers the Goods on Flavor”
E. “See It Now”—CBS—First television show on tobacco in 1955, which resulted in TIRC Tobacco Industry Research Committee
F. First Surgeon Generals report: Smoking and Health in 1964.
G. Marlboro Country ad campaign launched in 1964 as “Come to where the flavor is. Come to Marlboro country. Marlboro sales grow at 10% per year in 1964.
H. Women allowed to roll cigars in Cuban factories in 1960’s
I. Phillip Morris controls Miller Brewing Co. in 1969.
J. Surgeon General confirms link between maternal smoking and low birth weight in 1969.
K. RJ Reynolds Tobacco becomes RJ Reynolds Industries, Inc. in 1970.
L. TV ads for tobacco products banned in 1971
M. 1971 Cigarette companies begin sponsoring major sports events.
1. NASCAR’s Winston Cup series
2. Virginia Slims Tennis

I wonder what a much older Don Draper would have to say when he found out there would be no more cigarette ads on TV…

Read the remainder of the 20th C. timeline as well as significant events dating back to 6000 B.C.

The  Florida State University Research Foundation has an excellent section on their website for Tobacco Education called Science Tobacco & You.  There’s a Hangman game that threatens you with tobacco tar instead of a noose.  In the teacher’s edition of the timeline are highlights of tobacco history, from pre-15th C. to the present, nicely summarized.

There is a wealth of information on this website and it’s easy to become sidetracked.  Before diving in, it might be a good idea to read the navigation guide, which explains what structure was used to amass the available information.

Science, Tobacco & You is based on the premise that science is a learning processes that involves looking, thinking, asking, and sharing. The organization of this Website utilizes this idea.

Teachers may also want to check out the National High Magnetic Laboratory resource section for teachers.

A Bedtime Story: David Bowie “Glass Spider”

Posted in History, Music, Stories, Television by farmerjaneusa on February 2, 2011

I’d like to see this animated and performed by Maynard.

Songwriters: Jones, David Publishers: JONES MUSIC AMERICA

 

Up until one century ago there lived,
In the Zi Duang province of eastern country
A glass-like spider
Having devoured its prey it
would drape the skeletons
over its web
In weeks creating a macabre
Shrine of remains
Its web was also unique
in that it had many layers
Like floors in a building

At the top of this palace-like place,
assembled with
almost apparent
Care, were tiny,
shining objects,
glass,
beads,
dew-drops
One could almost call it an altar
When the breeze blew
thru this construction
It produced sounds of wailing,
crying
Tiny wails, tiny cries

The baby spiders would get scared
and search frantically for their mother.
But the Glass Spider would have long gone,
having known that the babies
Would survive somehow
on their own.
Oh-The Glass Spider had blue eyes
almost like-a human’s.
They shed tears at the wintered
turn of the centuries.

Don’t you hear this wasted cry,
Life is over you
(Mummy come back ’cause the water’s all gone)
But you’ve seen who’s in heaven.
Is there anyone in hell
(Mummy come back ’cause it’s dark now)
Take care, take care.
(Mummy come back ’cause the water’s all gone)

Somewhere she glows divine.
Somewhere she wakes alone.
But you, you’ve promise
in your lovin’ eye.

God it’s dark now.

Jah Jah Jah Jah Jah
Jah Jah Jah Jah Jah

Gone, Gone the water’s all gone
Mummy come back
’cause the water’s all gone
Stay low on the ground,
fire can drive you,
savage and afraid
Spitting the dawn,
come come come along
before the animals awake
Run, run, we’ve been moving all night,
rivers to the left.
If your mother don’t love you
then the riverbed might
Gone, gone, the water’s all gone
Mummy come back
’cause the water’s all gone

Jah Jah Jah Jah Jah
Jah Jah Jah Jah Jah

Gone gone the water’s all gone
Mummy come back
’cause the water’s all gone

 

 

 

 

Competent Enginners Behind the Aesthetic and Structural Expression of Stuttgart School

Posted in History, Travel by farmerjaneusa on July 30, 2010

Original Article written by Martin Trautz, Univ.-Prof. Dr.-Ing and Lorraine Lin, Ph.D., P.E.

These individuals formed the “critical mass” needed to extend the type of research conducted on the basics of structures, lightweight structures, structural detailing, and natural structures for which the Stuttgart School became famous.

“In Germany, the southern city of Stuttgart is a hot spot for engineering innovation. With a population of less than 600,000 inhabitants, Stuttgart is the home to internationally renowned companies, such as Daimler Benz, Bosch, and Porsche. However, not only premium cars and automotive products come from Stuttgart. The region is famous throughout Germany for the inventiveness of its people. It also gave birth to one of the most interesting modern movements in structural engineering and architecture, the “Stuttgarter Bauschule,” also known as the Stuttgart School of Building Design.

To a casual observer, a key feature of the Stuttgart School appears to be aesthetic and structural expression. However, hidden features which have made this possible include the high technical competence of engineers and architects, a high degree of integration of both disciplines starting at the university level, precision construction methods, and a desire to construct lightweight structures. The faculty at the local university has maintained close links with regional engineering offices; in fact, many of the key members of the Stuttgart School have been simultaneously university professors and partners in thriving engineering practices, which has allowed them both the resources to innovate new ideas and the actual projects to put them into practice. An important condition that facilitated the flourishing of structural innovation in Stuttgart has been the constellation of personalities associated with Stuttgart University.

Tanzbrunnen Fabric Roof in Cologne, Germany. Architect: Frei Otto. Courtesy of ILEK.

Curt Siegel (1911-2004), professor of statics and structural design at the faculty of architecture between 1950 and 1970, widened the spectrum of that discipline by introducing a systematic classification of load-bearing structures as an additional topic of his lectures and as a new field of building sciences. Siegel called this new field, which joins together static analysis of structures and structural forms, “Tragwerklehre.” This can be translated as “teaching on structures” or the translation of statics and materials science into physical objects. In 1957, together with Fritz Leonhardt (see more below), who was then the chair of concrete structures at the faculty of civil engineering, Siegel organized design projects for students of architecture and structural engineering. Leonhardt recognized that Siegel’s approach to “teaching on structures” was instructive not only to architecture students but also structural engineering students, so he was instrumental in ensuring that it became part of the engineering curriculum, as well.

Around this time, Leonhardt and Siegel fostered the appointment of Frei Otto (see more below) as the chair of lightweight structures and the foundation of a connected institute that conducted research on related subjects, which later became famous as the “Institute for Lightweight Structures” (IL). Frei Otto is an architect with a deep understanding of all things related to structures, structural forms, and development of structures in nature as well as in engineering. He specialized in design of tents and cable-net structures, and had already established a research laboratory for lightweight structures in Berlin.”

Read more.

Museum of Daimler-Benz, Stuttgart Germany. Engineer: Werner Sobek. Courtesy of Christian Richters, Münster, Germany.

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