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2nd Potential Alarm Fatigue Death in 4 Years in Boston Area Hospitals

Posted in Health by farmerjaneusa on September 21, 2011

‘Alarm fatigue’ a factor in 2d death

by Liz Kowalczyk

The second patient death in four years involving “alarm fatigue’’ at UMass Memorial Medical Center has pushed the hospital to intensify efforts to prevent nurses from tuning out monitor warning alarms.

Nurses exposed to a cacophony of beeps may no longer hear them or begin to ignore them, and that’s what appears to have happened in the latest case: A 60-year-old man died in an intensive care unit after alarms signaling a fast heart rate and potential breathing problems went unanswered for nearly an hour, according to state investigators who reviewed records at the hospital.

The death occurred in August 2010 but was not reported to the state Department of Public Health until this spring. The state cited various violations by the hospital, including not responding to alarms “in a timely manner.’’

The fatality was remarkably similar to another at the Worcester teaching hospital four years ago, when nurses didn’t hear or ignored alarms indicating that the battery on an elderly woman’s monitor needed to be replaced. After the battery failed, 77-year-old Madeline Warner suffered cardiac arrest and the alarm didn’t sound.

Warner’s death in 2007 led the hospital to adopt aggressive measures to improve nurses’ responses and tackle alarm fatigue, which can occur when nurses hear alarms – many of them false – all day long. But the new death shows the problem continues, as it does at hospitals nationwide. It has led to at least 200 patient deaths since 2005 and likely hundreds more, according to a Globe investigation published earlier this year.

“I don’t think any hospital has fully solved this problem,’’ said Maria Cvach, an assistant director of nursing at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore and a specialists on alarm fatigue. At Hopkins, which is known for its intense focus on reducing false alarms and alarm fatigue, Cvach said she still sees nurses “not hearing or not answering alarms’’ because “they go off all the time.’’

Executives at UMass Memorial declined to comment about the latest death. The Globe obtained the Department of Public Health report on the case through a freedom of information request. The document does not say who disclosed the death to the state or provide a reason for the reporting delay, but the Globe’s stories on alarm fatigue, which included an account of Warner’s death, appeared several weeks before the health department was called.

The state inspectors’ report, which omits the patient’s name and other identifying details, indicates that the patient also was the apparent victim of a medication error. It does not make clear the extent to which that error or alarm fatigue contributed to the patient’s death.

The patient had been cutting down a tree and was struck in the head with a large branch in July 2010, breaking bones in his face and causing bleeding in his brain. After surgery at UMass Memorial, the patient was often restless and agitated. He kept removing a monitor that measured whether his blood had enough oxygen, triggering an alarm to sound much of one day – which could have been a factor in desensitizing nurses.

Read the entire article at Boston.com

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Frequently Asked Questions About Remote Viewing

Posted in Health, Remote Viewing, Science, society by farmerjaneusa on May 23, 2011

from ProjectJedi.net:

In response to the many questions we receive about remote viewing and the perception process, we have decided to post a Q&A series of articles to answer the most commonly asked questions. We hope you will enjoy it.

This is part one of a five part question and answer series (Q&A) on perception based remote viewing, also known as Solo ERV or SERV.

Each article in the series will contain frequently asked questions about perception and remote viewing.

We will address questions on a variety of remote viewing experience levels.  Some of the questions will be for those new to remote viewing, other Q&A will be for experienced and advanced remote viewers.

Visit ProjectJedi.net for answers to questions you may have never thought to ask! If you have questions about remote viewing that haven’t been answered you can always visit the new open group on Facebook.  So far I’ve seen a lot of friendly people there heavily interested psychic abilities,  health topics and sharing knowledge.

You can view a sample video from the Project Jedi Remote Viewing Training DVD Set here.

Listening to the Wisdom of Whispering Water

Posted in Environment, Health, Paranormal, Remote Viewing by farmerjaneusa on May 8, 2011

If this is what written words and music can do to the form of ice crystals, what do our own words and choice of stimuli do to our bodies and minds?

As a remote viewer I have to ask: how am I affected by my assignment choices? Part of our brains resonate with what we perceive.  If a simple word on a jar can change the appearance of water,  I’m all the more inclined to cautiously choose what I allow myself to focus on during a session.

Will the vast majority of Earth’s population ever  listen to the wisdom whispered by the water?

Blessed is the man that Maketh the Lord his Trust

Posted in Health, Psychology, Religion, society by farmerjaneusa on April 20, 2011

Psalms 40:4

Blessed is that man that maketh the LORD his trust, and respecteth not the proud, nor such as turn aside to lies.

A simple statement from King David, but even Biblical commentators do not ignore it.  The most profound truths can be found in a plain spoken sentence.

From John Gill’s Exposition of the Bible:

Blessed is the man that maketh the Lord his trust
For such are safe and secure in him, are possessed of all blessings of grace through him, have peace in their own souls now, and shall enjoy eternal happiness with him hereafter;

and respecteth not the proud;
such as the Pharisees, and all self-righteous persons, who trust in themselves and their own righteousness, submit not to the righteousness of Christ, and despise others; to these such who trust in Christ have no respect; they neither esteem them, nor imitate them;

nor such as turn aside to lies;
to idols, the lying vanities of the Gentiles; or to any doctrines injurious to the person, office, blood, righteousness, sacrifice, and grace of Christ; which are no other than lies, and which those who believe in Christ have no respect to, but abhor both them and the abettors of them.

In a world of hyperboles, it is important to remember to remain plain spoken, even if you think others ignore your quiet words.  Vague and flashy people-pleasing statements are soon forgotten, or foster anger.

The simplest statements stand the test of time and have a chance as being seen as the most profound.  With reflection by the listener, they do not need iteration or long winded explanations.  They do not break up on the shore, but continue their journey down the stream, self-sufficient, strong and flexible.


A Tobacco Timeline: Pre-15th Century to Present

Posted in advertising, commerce, Environment, games, Health, History, Psychology, Science by farmerjaneusa on March 7, 2011

From Florida State University’s the “Science U” section:

1950’s to Present

A. Three important studies provide links between smoking and lung cancer:

    1. On May 27, 1950 Journal of the American Medical Association: publishes first major study
    2. In same issue, “Tobacco Smoking as a Possible Etiologic Factor in Bronchiogenic Carcinoma: A Study of 684 Proved Cases,” by Ernst L. Wynder and Evarts A. Graham is published.
    3. A Sept 30 British Medical Journal, study by Richard Doll and Bradford Hill reports that heavy smokers fifty times as likely as nonsmokers to contract lung cancer

B. P. Lorillard introduces Kent cigarettes, with an asbestos filter. 1952
C. Dr. Ernst Wynder paints tar on mice backs and causes cancer—first definitive biological link in 1953.
D. 1954 Phillip Morris hires David Hardy to defend against law suit by Missouri smoker who lost larynx to cancer in 1954. Same year, Marlboro man created and advertised as “Delivers the Goods on Flavor”
E. “See It Now”—CBS—First television show on tobacco in 1955, which resulted in TIRC Tobacco Industry Research Committee
F. First Surgeon Generals report: Smoking and Health in 1964.
G. Marlboro Country ad campaign launched in 1964 as “Come to where the flavor is. Come to Marlboro country. Marlboro sales grow at 10% per year in 1964.
H. Women allowed to roll cigars in Cuban factories in 1960’s
I. Phillip Morris controls Miller Brewing Co. in 1969.
J. Surgeon General confirms link between maternal smoking and low birth weight in 1969.
K. RJ Reynolds Tobacco becomes RJ Reynolds Industries, Inc. in 1970.
L. TV ads for tobacco products banned in 1971
M. 1971 Cigarette companies begin sponsoring major sports events.
1. NASCAR’s Winston Cup series
2. Virginia Slims Tennis

I wonder what a much older Don Draper would have to say when he found out there would be no more cigarette ads on TV…

Read the remainder of the 20th C. timeline as well as significant events dating back to 6000 B.C.

The  Florida State University Research Foundation has an excellent section on their website for Tobacco Education called Science Tobacco & You.  There’s a Hangman game that threatens you with tobacco tar instead of a noose.  In the teacher’s edition of the timeline are highlights of tobacco history, from pre-15th C. to the present, nicely summarized.

There is a wealth of information on this website and it’s easy to become sidetracked.  Before diving in, it might be a good idea to read the navigation guide, which explains what structure was used to amass the available information.

Science, Tobacco & You is based on the premise that science is a learning processes that involves looking, thinking, asking, and sharing. The organization of this Website utilizes this idea.

Teachers may also want to check out the National High Magnetic Laboratory resource section for teachers.

Is Mercury in your Eyedrops? Common Sources of Ethylmercury

Posted in Conspiracy, Environment, Fibromyalgia, Food, Health, Psychology, Remote Viewing, Science, society, Survival by farmerjaneusa on March 4, 2011

Compiled by: Melissa Kaplan

Products containing ethyl mercury thiosalicylic acid as a preservative:
Antitoxins
Cosmetics, including makeup removers, mascara, and eye moisturizers
Desensitizing solutions
Ear, eye, and nose drops
Eye ointments
Mercurochrome®
Merthiolate topical antiseptic
Soap-free cleaners
Some contact lens solutions
Topical medicated sprays
Topical medications
Tuberculin tests
Vaccines (including most influenza vaccines and Sanofi’s avian flu vaccines)

Other common sources of mercury:
Adhesives
Air conditioner filters
Amalgams (silver fillings)
Auto exhaust
Batteries
Bleached flour
Calomel (talc, body powders)
Cinnabar (used in jewelry)
Drinking water (tap and well), plumbing and piping
Fabric softeners
Felt
Floor waxes and polishes
Laxatives
Paint pigments and solvents
Pesticides
Processed foods
Vegetables and fruits exposed to pesticides
Wood preservatives

Other names for this ethylmercury:
Sodium ethylmercurithiosalicylate
Mercurothiolate
Merzonin
Mertorgan
Merfamin
Ethyl (2-mercaptobenzoato-S) mercury sodium salt
Thiomersalate
Thiomersal
Thiomersalan
[(o-carboxyphenyl)thio] Ethylmercury sodium salt

Examples of products containing thimerosal

Antibiotics for the Eye Cortisporin® Ophthalmic Suspension
Neosporin® Ophthalmic Solution
Nasal Preparations Nasal Moist® AF
Neo-Synephrine® Pediatric Formula, Mild Formula, Regular Strength, and Extra Strength Nasal Spray
Ear Preparations Coly-mycin® S Otic
Cortisporin® Otic Suspension
Pediotic® Suspension
Cosmetics L’Oreal® Miracle Wear Mascara
Stagelight® Mascara
Vaccines Hep-B-Gammagee®
Recombivax HB®
Hyper-Tet®
Tetanus and diphtheria toxoid

Examples of Products Free of Thimerosal

Eye Preparations Bausch & Lomb® Dry Eye Therapy
Murine® Lubricating Eyedrops
Hypotears® PF
Tobrex® and Tobradex® Solution or Ointment
Ocuflox® Solution
Timoptic® S
Iopidine®
Polysporin® Ophthalmic Ointment
Contact Lens Products Renu® Enzymatic Cleaner
Opti-One® Rewetting Drops
Bausch & Lomb® Sensitive Eyes Sterile Saline Spray
Nasal Preparations Afrin® Nasal Spray and Drops
NTZ® Nasal Spray and Drops
Beconase AQ®
Ear Preparations
Cortisporin® Otic Solution
Cosmetics All Almay® products
All Physicians Formula® products
Vaccines Most live-virus vaccines including influenza vaccine

If you are sensitive to mercury, you will also be sensitive to:
Piroxicam (Feldene®), an non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug

Information Sources:
Thimerosal Patient Counseling Center, www.truetest.com
Alternative & Complementary Therapies, June 1997

This list is also available in PDF format for easy printing.


Related Articles

Mercury Safety & Toxicity Links

On Liver, Thyroid, and Toxicity

Testing Labs

Safe Minds Alert: Flu Vaccines and What You Need To Know

source: http://www.anapsid.org/cnd/diffdx/mercurysources.html

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Stress Precedes Volume Reductions in the Hippocampus in PTSD

Posted in Health, Psychology, Science, Uncategorized by farmerjaneusa on October 14, 2010

from Science Blogs

There was a debate in the post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) for some time about whether the shrinkage observed in the hippocampus — a structure involved in learning and memory — was the result of the stress or was a vulnerability factor for the disease.

We know that high levels of cortisol — a stress hormone — can kill neurons. So you could argue that the stress and stress hormones that cause PTSD could also result in the reduction in hippocampal volume. This is the so-called neurotoxicity hypothesis.

On the other hand, individuals who get PTSD could have some underlying genetic or structural susceptibility, one characteristic of which could be an already smaller hippocampus. This is the so-called vulnerability hypothesis.

Researchers at Stanford have published a paper that adds credibility to the neurotoxicity hypothesis.

The researchers followed a cohort of 15 recently diagnosed PTSD patients age 7 to 13 over the course of 12 to 18 months. They tracked the sizes of their hippocampi at the beginning and the end of the interval using MRI images and also measured their cortisol levels.

The researchers found that over the interval the sizes of the hippocampi in the patients went down.

Our results support the hypotheses that PTSD symptoms and cortisol levels at baseline are associated with changes in hippocampal volume over an ensuing 12- to 18-month interval. Specifically, we found that severity of PTSD symptoms and cortisol levels predict a reduction in hippocampal volume from baseline to follow-up when controlling for pubertal maturation and gender in children with a history of traumatic stress. This is the first longitudinal study in PTSD to document an association between hippocampal changes with PTSD symptoms and with a marker of stress, cortisol levels. These longitudinal findings help elucidate previous cross-sectional reports of smaller hippocampal volumes in PTSD populations. Our results are also in accord with animal literature reporting on the neurotoxic effects of glucocorticoids in the hippocampus. Our results stand in contrast, however, with studies identifying hippocampal volume as a vulnerability factor. Although, this study was not designed to address the vulnerability factor hypothesis, our exploratory analyses suggest that hippocampal volume was not a risk factor for development of PTSD symptoms….

Our cortisol findings address a potential mechanism by which stress can alter the hippocampus. There is substantial animal literature demonstrating the neurotoxic effects of glucocorticoid in the glucocorticoid receptor-rich hippocampus. Glucocorticoids can also exert their neurotoxicity indirectly via accumulation of extracellular glutamate. High levels of glucocorticoids have been reported in children with history of maltreatment and PTSD. Elevated cortisol levels suggest that high levels of stress lead to activation of the HPA axis and cortisol production and that this leads to hippocampal toxicity, which results in poor inhibitory activity from the hippocampus unto other centers, such as the HPA axis itself. The putative neurotoxic effects of cortisol on the hippocampus may depend on at least 3 factors: (1) the developmental stage of the structure (the hippocampus glucocorticoid receptors density may change throughout development), (2) the level and sustainability of cortisol released, and (3) the severity and/or chronicity of the stressful events.

Other studies have attempted to follow patients with PTSD, but they have been done on older patient populations that have often had PTSD for much longer. This is a confound in the ability to measure hippocampal volume changes because chronic stress may not cause changes and stress that is far removed may have given the brain time to recover.

The recognition that stress does shrink the hippocampus rather than that a small hippocampus is a susceptibility factor for PTSD may have consequences in terms of patient treatment. In theory, we would like to short circuit the shrinkage of the hippocampus by some pharmacological means, or maybe we could improve function by providing cognitive training.

July 4th Fireworks Are No Blast For Pets

Posted in Animals, Health, Psychology, society, Uncategorized by farmerjaneusa on July 3, 2010

The wafting of delicious meaty scents from every direction and the overwhelming repeated blasts of gunshots and fireworks accompanied by bright lights and excited voices is enough to send animals over the edge.

Imagine not having a clue what was going on during this Independence Day Weekend.  What would you think of these unusual events?

Pet safety should be a priority this Indenpendence Day WeekendWhat if you are an animal and your owners are not there to comfort you and keep you from harm?  As is the case with some animals, try to understand the anxiety of not being able to protect your owners, or not knowing where they are, when there is certain mayhem knocking at the door.

Put yourself in their innocent position.  Animals often get lost, hurt or killed when running from perceived danger or toward the confusing and undeniable scents of a neighborhood full of BBQs.

You can’t explain to them the reasons behind the activities, but you can think ahead and, at the very least, keep your pets from getting loose.

From the Human Society Website:

“Returning home from a holiday celebration, Sharon Moore and her family discovered feces on their living room floor.

The sliding glass door to their backyard was open, and a hole had been dug under their fence.

The Moores were gone for only four hours, but D.O.G., their 2-year-old, aptly-named white German Shepherd, was gone. Left on her own to face the tumult of fireworks and loud celebrations, she escaped, apparently to seek the familiar—her family—even if she had no idea where to look.

‘From what we can tell, when D.O.G. heard the fireworks she freaked out and pooped on the floor inside—for the first time ever—then she opened the sliding glass door with her paw, and dug a hole outside our fence…. She went searching for us,’ said Moore, of Maitland, Fla.

The Moores’ search for D.O.G. ended when she was found dead alongside a road where she was often walked.

No Celebration

Pet safety should be a priority this Independence Day WeekendMoore believes that D.O.G., who wasn’t normally scared of thunder or other loud noises, panicked from the cumulative effects of the fireworks, the excited voices outside, and being left alone inside the house.

The Moores’ tragic loss isn’t unique. Pets often become frightened and frantic by the noise and commotion of Independence Day. In fact, animal shelters across the country are accustomed to receiving “July 4th” dogs—dogs who run off during fireworks celebrations and are rescued by animal control officers or good Samaritans who take them to the safety of a local shelter.

Leave Them At Home

Fortunately, preventing pet problems on Independence Day is possible by simply planning ahead and taking some basic precautions.

‘With a little bit of planning and forethought, you can enjoy the excitement of the Fourth of July and know that your animal companion is safe, sound, and enjoying a little peace and quiet,’ said Nancy Peterson, an issues specialist with The Humane Society if the United States.

To protect your pet on the Fourth of July, take these precautions:

  • Resist the urge to take your pet to fireworks displays.
  • Do not leave your pet in the car. With only hot air to breathe inside a car, your pet can suffer serious health effects—even death—in a few short minutes. Partially opened windows do not provide sufficient air, but they do provide an opportunity for your pet to be stolen.
  • Keep your pets indoors at home in a sheltered, quiet area. Some animals can become destructive when frightened, so be sure that you’ve removed any items that your pet could destroy or that would be harmful to your pet if chewed. Leave a television or radio playing at normal volume to keep him company while you’re attending Fourth of July picnics, parades, and other celebrations.
  • If you know that your pet is seriously distressed by loud noises like thunder, consult with your veterinarian before July 4th for ways to help alleviate the fear and anxiety he or she will experience during fireworks displays.
  • Never leave pets outside unattended, even in a fenced yard or on a chain. In their fear, pets who normally wouldn’t leave the yard may escape and become lost, or become entangled in their chain, risking injury or death.
  • Make sure your pets are wearing identification tags so that if they do become lost, they can be returned promptly. Animals found running at-large should be taken to the local animal shelter, where they will have the best chance of being reunited with their owners.
  • If you plan to go away for the holiday weekend, read our information on Caring for Pets When You Travel.

If you follow these simple precautions, you and your pet can have a safe and happy Fourth of July.

Updated June 23, 2009.”

Original article (retrieved July 2, 2010): http://www.hsus.org/pets/pet_care/summer_care_tips_for_you_and_your_pets/keep_your_pet_safe_on_july_4th.html

Insomniacs – Simple Solutions to Better Sleep

Posted in Health, Uncategorized by farmerjaneusa on May 26, 2010

Original Article: http://www.selfhelpmagazine.com/article/insomnia

Can’t Sleep? 15 Proven Tips for Insomnia

by Marlene M. Maheu, Ph.D.

Marsha had been suffering from insomnia for a long time. She’s tried just about everything that folk wisdom and her beloved Grandmother taught her – counting sheep, warm milk before bed, reading, rubbing her feet and rubbing her head. She’s spent a fortune on relaxation tapes, mood music, as well as a computer self-hypnosis program that just seems to wake her up and make her dizzy more than put her to sleep. All too many nights, she lays in bed, listening to her partner snore, while she tosses, turns, gets up and reads Internet self-help articles about what to do!

The science of psychology has a lot to say about what works and doesn’t work for people like Marsha. Those who struggle with insomnia and other sleep problems often benefit from a range of solutions, rather than a single cure. Here are some facts for you to consider while you think about your own sleep disturbances.

I. Insomnia can be caused by a variety of conditions including: change, stress, physical pain, trauma, illness, and emotions, PTSD, death of a loved one, or recurrent thoughts.

II. Insomnia can come on at any stage in life. Old sleep habits might need to be changed or altered to be successful at overcoming insomnia. Returning to more natural rhythms and habits can take time. Be patient. If you’ve had a lifelong problem with sleep, you unfortunately may not find an overnight cure. There is no immediate solution unless you want to take medicine, which can often lead to a wide range of other serious problems. The goal of this article is to help you make sensible decisions regarding the role of sleep in your life, and return to more natural, reasonable ways of approaching and thinking about sleep.

III. 15 Tips to Overcome Insomnia

    RETINAL STIMULATION – make it a point to go outside and stimulate your retinas (eyes) for about 15 minutes a day with sunlight. This “full on” light exposure can help restore your body’s natural sleep/night cycle, also known as the “circadian rhythm.” Looking straight into the sun is never a good idea, but being in an area where you receive the full brightness of the sun around you is what’s recommended.
    NO NAPS – Avoid naps during the day. If you sleep during the day, your body may not be as tired as necessary to get to sleep at night.
    COOL ROOM – Keep the temperature in your room cool and comfortable.
    WAKING ACTIVITIES – Don’t participate in waking activities while in bed, like watching TV, eating, talking on the telephone, texting your friends, or using your laptop. Remember, bed has traditionally been for sleep. Train yourself to limit your bed-related activities, and your body will begin to associate your bed with sleepiness. Reading in bed is different. Reading can help you focus your mind, especially if what you read is boring. Save the murder mysteries for daytime and pick up a boring book for sleep. Reading in bed is an age-old trick for quickly getting to sleep.
    GO TO BED AT REGULAR TIME – There’s no easy answer to the problem of being too tired during day-time and not tired enough at bed-time. Nonetheless, most experts agree that it is most helpful for you to go to bed at a regular, planned time. If you need to sleep more, it’s better for you to go to bed at your regular time and get up earlier. With time, your body should re-adjust and give you the hours you need. Be careful about driving or operating machinery when not fully rested, though. If you feel tired to the point of losing visual focus, you should definitely not be operating heavy machinery – no matter what. When not sleeping well for a period of time, ask someone else to drive you to work, if you can.
    DON’T EXERCISE (<3 HOURS) – Don’t exercise within three hours of trying to fall asleep – this raises the heartrate. Slow stretching on the other hand might be just what the doctor ordered to get your body slowed down and feeling good.
    DON’T EAT STIMULATING FOODS (<3 HOURS) – Don’t eat stimulating foods within three hours of trying to fall asleep – lying horizontally interrupts digestion and may cause heartburn. Also, eating high fat and carbohydrate foods might help make you groggy and help you fall asleep, but calorie-conscious people may need to weigh the benefits of such an approach to insomnia.
    AVOID STIMULANTS (<2-3 hours) – Avoid all stimulants such as caffeinated and nicotine in cigarettes. Caffeinated products include coffee, tea, sodas, and especially colas. Even some aspirin or other headache remedies often contain caffeine! “Energy drinks”, Mountain Dew and a wide variety of other “energy bars” or supplements often contain a high amount of stimulating products. Check your vitamin and other supplements to make sure none of them are stimulating as well. (Look them up on an Internet search engine if you are unsure.) Check labels to see if products like aspirin are in any other product you take before bed. It is a surprise to many people to learn that even cigarettes can be stimulating when you are tired. Stay away from all these substances if you want a good night’s sleep.
    AVOID LIQUIDS. (<2 HOURS) – many people are just simply drinking too many fluids before sleep. Parents with bedwetting children learn to curtail all liquids about 2 hours before sleep, thereby allowing the child’s body to void excess liquids about 30-60 minutes before actual bed-time. Well, adults have the same pattern of voiding as children. If liquids are taken before sleep, those liquids create an urgency to urinate that can awaken the adult. While that adult usually has enough bladder control to get to the bathroom, they often do not have the ability to get back to sleep. Stop drinking before sleep, and see if you stop waking up to urinate.
    WIND DOWN (<90 MINS) – 90 minutes before you go to bed, wind own your day and don’t participate in anxiety-inducing activities like checking your mail, email or even watching the evening news.
    WRITE DOWN CONCERNS (<30 MINS) – Spend a few minutes before bed at night writing down your concerns and stresses, then hopes or things you’re thankful for, so that you can give your mind a rest while you are sleeping.
    CALMING MUSIC/SELF-HYPNOSIS – Listen to calming music, white noise, self-hypnosis or a “brain recalibration” tape for sleep. Such tapes are scientifically designed to help you “reset” your brain and calm down. When developed by researchers rather than marketers, they are remarkably effective. Just be sure to buy your brain recalibration audios from reputable sleep companies, and not slick marketing companies.
    GET UP IF YOU CAN’T SLEEP – If you can’t fall asleep after 15-20 minutes get out of bed.
    AVOID BRIGHT LIGHTS – if you wake up in the middle of the night and can’t get back to sleep within 30 minutes, get up but avoid as much light as possible. Light will only stimulate your brain’s day/night balance (circadian cycle). Avoid computer-based hypnosis programs just prior to going to bed for the same reason. The light emitted from a computer screen is intense. Any strong light is more likely to stimulate and wake your nervous system.
    REDIRECT NIGHTMARES/BAD THOUGHTS – If you have a nightmare or stress-inducing thoughts, focus on a different ending. Write down your nightmare, or tell someone else about it to stop the continual thoughts.

The goal of this article was to help you find the right self-diagnosis for your specific underlying problem.

If you are doing all 15 suggestions above and still have sleep problems, it’s time to call a professional. Contact a physician or psychotherapist who specializes in sleep.
If you still can’t sleep well after a few months of working with your sleep specialist, ask your doctor for a formal “sleep study.” Be sure that study doesn’t just check to see if you have “sleep apnea” If you’re going to go to the hassle of a sleep study, be sure they check for all possible sources of your difficulty and not just one. Most insurance carriers will pay for such a study of it is requested by a licensed specialist.

If your sleep study suggests a “C-PAP” machine, try it. While it can be off-putting at first, most people can successfully adjust to it and find it to be enormously helpful if they have sleep apnea.

Avoid sleep medication, as this might create a dependency and only prolong your sleep problems. Some classes of such medications are far worse than others. For example, if your doctor tries to give you benzodiazepines for long-term sleep problems, run for the hills. Benzodiazepines have some of the most negative withdrawal symptoms of any other class of medication. In fact, withdrawal from heroine has been documented to pale in comparison to some withdrawal from long-term use of ativan, klonipin or valium.

Keep yourself honest by asking your loved ones for feedback about your sleep habits. Ask any one who lives with you for their honest opinion regarding how you might or might not be adhering to the full list of suggestions above.
Everyone has a different underlying reason why they are having sleeping problems. Experiment with the above 15 steps and see what works for you.

References:

1. “Several Sleep Disorders Reflect Gender Differences”. http://pn.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/42/10/40. Retrieved 2008-08-29.

2. Mendelson WB (2008). “New Research on Insomnia: Sleep Disorders May Precede or Exacerbate Psychiatric Conditions”. Psychiatric Times 25 (7).
http://www.psychiatrictimes.com/insomnia/article/10168/1163082.

3. Kripke DF, Garfinkel L, Wingard DL, Klauber MR, Marler MR (February 2002). “Mortality associated with sleep duration and insomnia”. Arch. Gen. Psychiatry 59 (2): 131–6. PMID 11825133. http://archpsyc.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/59/2/131.

4. Kirkwood CK (1999). “Management of insomnia”. J Am Pharm Assoc 39 (5): 688–96; quiz 713–4. PMID 10533351.

5. Jacobs, Gregg; Edward F. Pace-Schott, Robert Stickgold, Michael W. Otto (September 27, 2004). “Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Pharmacotherapy for Insomnia: A Randomized Controlled Trial and Direct Comparison”. Archives of Internal Medicine 164 (17): 1888–1896. doi:10.1001/archinte.164.17.1888. PMID 15451764.
http://archinte.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/164/17/1888?ijkey=6a2af558….

6. KARL E. MILLER, M.D. (July 2005). “Cognitive Behavior Therapy vs. Pharmacotherapy for Insomnia”. American Family Physician. http://www.aafp.org/afp/20050715/tips/7.html.

About the Author:

Dr. Maheu is an licensed psychologist, author, speaker, and researcher.
She is the lead author of “E-Health, Telehealth & Telemedicine: A Guide to Program Startup and Success” co-written with Pamela Whitten and Ace Allen, published by Jossey-Bass: San Francisco.
She has also been the author for these books: “Infidelity on the Internet” and “The Mental Health Professional and the New Technologies.”

Originally published 4/15/98

Revised 8/31/09 by Marlene M. Maheu, Ph.D.

CleanWear Aims for Positive Impact with “Put on a Clean Shirt” Message

Posted in apparel, Art, Colorado, Facebook, Health, Social Media, Twitter, Uncategorized by farmerjaneusa on March 30, 2010

The story behind CleanWear is not an unfamiliar one when it comes to parents not only trying to cope with a child’s struggle with drug abuse, but provide guidance and a hopeful message with meaning and substance.

According to the founders of this homegrown business:

CleanWear came to be in the fall of 2009 when our family envisioned a way for our oldest son, Josh, to have a second chance at success after many years of substance abuse problems that led him down a dark road.

The CleanWear mission is as striking as their clothing line. A portion of their revenue from clothing and fashion accessories goes toward personal growth programs such as addiction and education. They are committed to hiring people who need a second chance. Presumably not wanting to take a narrow approach, they strive to keep manufacturing of their products within American borders whenever possible. This start up also made a decision to be an active member on Twitter and Facebook.

"Put on a Clean Shirt" Campaign

It’s not just a shirt, it’s about hope and empowerment. When communities pull together, have a solid plan, and lift others up, we are surely all better off.

Read more at WAYD?

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